Read On!

Mrs. Farquharson’s musings about books for children and young adults

Mary Garber

September30

miss-maryIt has become commonplace to see women as sports reporters on television or covering sports on the Internet in 2016. This is a fairly recent occurrence though. Contemporary female professional sports writers and commentators owe a debt of gratitude to Mary Garber (1916-2008), a pioneer in that field. Miss Mary Reporting by Sue Macy, illustrated by C. F. Payne (Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers) is a picture book biography that brings Mary to life.

Mary Garber’s family moved from New York City to Winston-Salem, North Carolina when she was eight years old, and Winston-Salem was Mary’s home for the rest of her life. Growing up, Mary enjoyed many sports, especially tackle football with the boys. As a youngster, she was the quarterback for the Buena Vista Devils, known as the BVDs. In school, she played softball and tennis, two sports where it didn’t matter that she was only five feet tall and under one hundred pounds. Her father took Mary and her sister to many athletic events, and he made sure that they understood all of the rules of the games.

mary_garberAfter college, Mary knew that she wanted to be a reporter, although her first assignment was as a society reporter and then a general news reporter. During WWII, she began covering sports when all of the men enlisted. After the war, there was a year that she went back to general reporting, but after that brief interlude the sports beat was hers. There were many obstacles that Mary had to overcome just to do her job. Jackie Robinson became a role model for her. While he was facing taunts and jeers, he remained dignified and kept silent. The discrimination that she faced as a woman in a field of men didn’t match the prejudice that Robinson experienced, but Mary and Jackie were both breaking stereotypes. (Photo from Wikipedia)

During her career, Mary had to fight for admittance to press boxes, stand outside of locker rooms, be ignored by coaches, and even once sew a tear in a basketball players uniform because she was a woman. Along the way coaches began to admire her determination, and readers enjoyed her insights. One of her most significant accomplishments was her advocacy for fighting segregation. She began reporting on games played in Winston-Salem’s all-black schools. No reporter had ever done that. Mary said, “It seemed to me that black parents were as interested in what their kids were doing as white parents were.” Mary cared.

The Mary Garber Pioneer Award is given annually by the Association For Women in Sports Media.

Oh my goodness! (Will’s Words)

May27

will'sEaten out of house and home, Not budge an inch, Seen better days, and Into thin air are all phrases that we use today, and they were all first used by William Shakespeare. The author, Jane Sutcliffe, wrote that she wanted to publish a book in her own words about the Globe Theater and William Shakespeare. As she progressed on the project, Sutcliffe became so enamored with Shakespeare’s words and phrases that an entirely different book came to be. Will’s Words: How William Shakespeare Changed the Way You Talk (Charlesbridge) is illustrated by John Shelley. This author and illustrator’s collaboration is an engaging title that will educate and amuse readers of all ages.

Here’s an example from Will’s Words:

WILL’S WORDS: Green-eyed monster

WHAT IT MEANS: Jealousy. Four hundred years ago the color green was thought to be the color of jealousy. (That’s why we say “green with envy.”)

WHERE IT COMES FROM: Othello, Act 3, Scene 3. The villain tells the hero of the play to beware that green-eyed monster jealousy-then he does everything he can to make him jealous.

The “Eyes” Have It

May18

Picture book biographies aren’t just for our younger students anymore. Many of these short, illustrated biographies are for older children too. A couple of our recent acquisitions will also be of interest to adults, and they both demonstrate the unique perspective that artists have.

eyeJosef Albers’ work with color was an important milestone for artists, teachers, and anyone who is interested in the use of color. An Eye for Color: The Story of Josef Albers by Natasha Wing, illustrated by Julia Breckenreid (Henry Holt) clearly describes Albers’ curiosity about how colors work with each other, and how differently they react with each other.

In order to use color effectively it is necessary to recognize that color deceives continually.      –Josef Albers

dorothea's

Dorothea Lange also viewed our world through an artist’s eyes, but her art form was photography. Long after her death, some of her photographs remain as masterpieces that define our history. Dorothea’s Eyes by Barb Rosenstock, illustrated by Gérard DuBois (Calkins Creek) narrates this remarkable woman’s life and explains how she often felt invisible.

This is the way it is. Look at it! Look at it!         -Dorothea Lange

 

1936 --- Florence Owens Thompson, 32, a poverty-stricken migrant mother with three young children, gazes off into the distance. This photograph, commissioned by the FSA, came to symbolize the Great Depression for many Americans. --- Image by © CORBIS

1936 — Florence Owens Thompson, 32, a poverty-stricken migrant mother with three young children, gazes off into the distance. This photograph, commissioned by the FSA, came to symbolize the Great Depression for many Americans. — Image by © CORBIS

(Image taken from History.com)

The Beatles

May6

…But tomorrow may rain, so I’ll follow the sun.   – The Beatles

As a baby boomer, I enjoy sharing my memories of growing up and the music that I enjoyed and still enjoy with children. They have a vague concept of a band named The Beatles, but few know anything about the “Fab Four” or their songs.

fabTwo recent additions to our collection should intrigue intermediate and middle school readers. Fab Four Friends: The Boys Who Became the Beatles by Susanna Reich, illustrated by Adam Gustavson (Henry Holt) is a picture book biography and a fine introduction to the early lives of John, Paul, George, and Ringo. The young men had much in common, growing up in Liverpool, England and finding escape in music.

beatlesA more sophisticated and more comprehensive title is How the Beatles Changed the World by Martin W. Sandler (Bloomsbury). There are many black and white and color photographs throughout the book that chronicles the rise of one of the most influential musical groups in history.

Gus & Me

April28

The bond, the special bond, between kids and grandparents is unique and should be treasured. This is the story of one of those magical moments. May I be as great a grandfather as Gus was to me. –Keith Richards

                                                                                                                   

Growing up during the rock and roll music revolution during the 1960s was an exciting and memorable time. There were two bands that dominated the airwaves – The Beatles and The Rolling Stones. We watched them perform on the Ed Sullivan Show and bought their albums. The music from these two bands has become synonymous with rock and roll. The Beatles and The Rolling Stones are “Rock and Roll”.  While there have been a number of books written about The Beatles for children and young adults, there aren’t many (any?) about The Rolling Stones.

gusThere is a delightful book that Keith Richards, one of the founding members of The Stones, wrote with Barnaby Harris and Bill Shapiro called Gus & Me: The Story of My Granddad and My First Guitar (Little Brown). Richards reminisces about his childhood and pays homage to his grandfather, Theodore Augustus Dupree, who started him on his musical journey.

Keith had many family members who enjoyed music but it was his grandfather who lit the spark that would flame into a passion for music. This musical legend spent many childhood days walking throughout London and the English countryside, and his grandfather always hummed every step of the way. During some of their rambles, Gus took Keith to repair shops where they watched experts fix broken musical instruments. It was after one of these visits that Keith became interested in a guitar that was on the top of his grandfather’s piano. Gus eventually gave this guitar to Keith and taught him to play the classic piece “Malagueña”. Gus told Keith that when he mastered that song, he would be able to learn to play anything, and so he did.

The illustrations for Gus & Me were composed by Theodora Richards, Keith’s daughter, who is named after his grandfather. For inspiration and accuracy, she returned to her father’s childhood home, used family photos, and consulted with her father while she was illustrating the book.

Check out this video of a younger Keith Richards playing “Malagueña”.

This is one of six clips where Keith Richards talks about writing the book.

Beatrix Potter

March10

peterJuly 28th will be the 150th anniversary of Beatrix Potter’s birth. Many events are scheduled in Great Britain and the United States to celebrate her life.

Beatrix Potter, one of the world’s most famous storytellers, is celebrated in a new biography for our youngest readers. Beatrix Potter and Her Paint Box was written and illustrated by David McPhail (Henry Holt, 2015). The author/illustrator used watercolor and ink on illustration board for the delightful artwork that is reminiscent of Potter’s own art.

beatrixMcPhail’s spare text begins by describing what life was like for children during the 19th century when nannies and tutors worked for wealthy families. The children sometimes spent a great deal of time exploring on their own. Beatrix was given her mother’s paint box when she was young, and the girl made her own sketchbooks out of paper and string. From the beginning, Beatrix drew and painted animals and scenes from nature. While she was given formal painting lessons, she preferred to paint in her own style, so the tutoring was stopped. As an adult, Miss Potter wrote and illustrated a story about a rabbit for the son of a friend who was sick. Remembering her own time of convalescence from an illness when she was a child, Beatrix sent along her little story to cheer him. The child’s mother encouraged the artist to publish her book, and The Tale of Peter Rabbit became a gift to all children.

There are many, many books written for children and adults about this remarkable woman. McPhail’s just happens to be the latest biography written for beginning readers. It is a natural companion to Potter’s own tales of Peter Rabbit, Benjamin Bunny, Jemima Puddle Duck, and so many other delightful characters. Fair warning…adults who share Miss Potters tales and biography with their children, just may become immersed in her world. The numerous adult biographies and books about her home and gardens are tantalizing. Two of my adult favorites are At Home with Beatrix Potter: The Creator of Peter Rabbit by Susan Denyer (Frances Lincoln, 2009) and Beatrix Potter’s Gardening Life: The Plants and Places That Inspired the Classic Children’s Tales by Marta McDowell (Timber Press, 2013).

Celebrating Black History in Books

February11

As we celebrate Black History Month in February, I would like to revisit two books that were recognized this year by the American Library Association, Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer (Candlewick) and Trombone Shorty (Abrams).

voiceCarole Boston Weatherford’s picture book biography about Fannie Lou Hamer is important to share with our middle school students. As the granddaughter of slaves and the youngest of twenty children, she endured illness, poverty, extreme acts of prejudice, and racism that included physical attacks on her personally. Hamer was active in the civil rights movement. As part of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, she addressed the 1964 Democratic National Convention about the voter discrimination in the south. Hamer’s passion was evident in her powerful singing voice, and she reached millions of people through her beautiful gift.
Fannie Lou Hamer singing:

tromA contemporary musician who shares his talent with the world is Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews. He tells us his story in the phenomenal picture book biography Trombone Shorty. Even as a young boy, music resonated in Troy’s home and neighborhood of Tremé in New Orleans.
He made his own instruments until one day Troy found a broken trombone. With practice, Troy taught himself to play, and his brother gave him the nickname “Trombone Shorty”. One day, his mother took him to the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, and Troy brought his trombone along. When Bo Diddley was on the stage, Troy began to play along. Bo Diddley invited him to the stage. Trombone Shorty continued to revel in his music, and his talent is a gift to today’s jazz lovers.

Award Season

January15

Award Season

caldecott-medalOn one Monday morning every January, everyone who is involved with children’s books anxiously awaits the announcement of the awards that are given by the American Library Association. Librarians, teachers, students, authors, illustrators, booksellers, and publishers all wonder whether their favorites will be mentioned for the Caldecott and Newbery Awards or whether a little recognized book will be honored. Will we agree with the choices? Will there be controversy? Who will get the awards?

This year, the committees had a number of books from which to choose in many categories. As someone who promotes books to young people, I felt that there were many outstanding books published in 2015. The award that is nearest and dearest to me is the Randolph Caldecott Medal, which is given “to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children.”

WinnieThe 2016 Caldecott winner is Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear, illustrated by Sophie Blackall and written by Lindsay Mattick (Little, Brown). I have especially shared this book with our third graders as an introduction to my Winnie-the-Pooh unit. This true story chronicles the life of a bear cub that became the inspiration for A.A. Milne’s classic, Winnie-the-Pooh. Harry Colebourn was a veterinarian in Canada. As a soldier during WWI, his unit was assigned to travel to England and France to care for the horses used in battle. On their train ride in Canada, Colebourn bought a bear cub that was being sold by a trapper at one of the train stops. He named the cub Winnipeg, and she became known as Winnie. Lindsay Mattick is the great-granddaughter of that soldier, and she wrote the story with a nod to the style that A.A. Milne used in Winnie-the-Pooh. She wrote little asides with her son asking questions, just as Milne’s son, Christopher Robin asked his father questions during his story. I am a huge fan of Sophie Blackall’s art and spirit. Her illustrations in the book are in watercolors to depict the history of Winnie. She used Chinese ink drawings for the present day author and her son.

win2It is with a bit of serendipity that there was another picture book written this year about Harry Colebourn and his pet. Sally M. Walker’s fictionalized account of Winnie’s origins is Winnie: The True Story of the Bear Who Inspired Winnie-the-Pooh (Macmillan). This version is interesting to pair with the Caldecott winner. The children became book critics as they examine the differences in the art and writing.

 

There were four books that are Caldecott Honor Books this year.

lastLast Stop on Market Street by Matt de la Peña, illustrated by Christian Robinson (G. P. Putnam’s Sons)

Trombone

 

 

 

Trombone Shorty by Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews, illustrated by Bryan Collier (Abrams Books for Young Readers)
voiceVoice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer: Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement by Carole Boston Weatherford, illustrated by Ekua Holmes (Candlewick Press)

 

 

 

WaitingWaiting by Kevin Henkes (Greenwillow Books)

 

 

 

 

 

 

This year’s Newbery Award books also deserve a separate and future blog entry.

Henri Matisse

May6

The Museum of Modern Art in New York City presented a fascinating exhibit in 2014 called Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs. The exhibition catalog for the exhibit is inspiring, and I knew that we had a number of books in the DCD library that discussed this talented artist’s life. Many of them focus on the time in his life when Matisse created almost entirely with paper and scissors.
Henri Matisse was born in 1869 in Le Cateau-Cambrésis, France. He lived in Paris for most of his life, and his avant-garde work was known internationally. At seventy-two, the artist became very ill, and nearly bedridden. Instead of giving up all of his art, he developed his ideas in a new medium – large cutouts from hand-painted paper that his assistants hung around the room for him.
m3The Iridescence of Birds: A Book About Henri Matisse by Patricia MacLachlan, illustrated by Hadley Hooper (Roaring Brook Press, 2014) is a simple tale of Henri’s childhood, and how his surroundings influenced his later works.
Jeanette Winter also wrote a biography of the master for our youngest readers in Henri’s Scissors (Beach Lane, 2013).  Marjorie Blaine Parker’s biography, Colorful Dreamer: The Story of Henri Matisse (Dial, 2012) is an enticing complement to Winter’s work.
m4Jane O’Connor and Jessie Hartland teamed up to produce Henri Matisse: Drawing with Scissors (Grosset & Dunlap, 2002). Their children’s biography is in the form of a school report that a student has written. It contains images of some of Matisse’s work and a discussion of his life.
My three favorite picture book biographies on this master are Matisse: The King of Color by Laurence Anholt (Barron’s, 2007) and Matisse’s Garden by Samantha Friedman, illustrated by Cristina Amodeo (MoMA, 2014), and Colorful Dreamer: The Story of Artist Henri Matisse by Marjorie Blaine Parker, illustrated by Holly Berry (Dial, 2012).
mAnholt provides details of Matisse’s life that aren’t covered in other children’s books. He chronicles the relationship that Henri had with Monique, a young nurse who helped him through a serious illness. Monique became his confidant, but she eventually left and entered a religious order as a nun. Year’s later, the nun and artist were reunited, and Matisse built the Chapelle du Rosaire as a gift to Monique and the other nuns who cared for him. He designed seventeen stained glass windows that fill the chapel with light, color, and pattern.
m2Matisse’s Garden was published by The Museum of Modern Art to coincide with the recent exhibit. This tale concentrates solely on Henri’s cut-outs, but the book itself is a masterpiece with pages that open out in double spreads to illustrate some of his larger cut-outs.

 

matisseColorful Dreamer is just that, colorful. Holly Berry’s illustrations are a combination of more realistic sketches of Henri and his family combined with colorful collages that evoke his artwork and imagination.

 

MissOh, and I still haven’t mentioned a book for our older readers and art enthusiasts, Miss Etta and Dr. Claribel:Bringing Matisse to America by Susan Fillion (Godine, 2011). Two unmarried sisters from a German-Jewish family in Baltimore amassed one of the most amazing collections of modern art in America. They concentrated on works by Matisse, although they also purchased many paintings by Vuillard, Cézanne, Gauguin, and Picasso. The sisters’ collection was bequeathed to The Baltimore Museum of Art.

Pedro Martínez

April23

Ramón is the biggest reason
I have gotten where I am.
He is the great one in this family.
I am still Ramón’s little brother.
-Pedro Martínez, 1998

pedroMatt Tavares shares an inspirational story in Growing Up Pedro (Candlewick Press, 2015). Pedro Martínez got his first real baseball glove when his older brother, Ramón, signed a contract with the Los Angeles Dodgers for five thousand dollars. The Martínez family lived in the village of Manoguayabo in the Dominican Republic, and Ramón was the baseball star of the family. Ramón told Pedro stories of his struggles in the United States because he couldn’t speak much English. Pedro began to study English, and when he was eventually given a shot in the Dodgers’ minor-league system, he could be interviewed without an interpreter.

Many players and fans implied that Pedro only made the team because Ramón was a star pitcher. Pedro was determined to prove them wrong, and he became one of the best relievers in the league. When the Dodgers traded Pedro to the Montreal Expos, Ramón encouraged him to prove his talent. In Montreal, he became a starting pitcher. The Martínez brothers even got to pitch against each other – Ramón won. After Pedro won the National League Cy Young Award in 1997, the Expos couldn’t afford to pay him, and they traded him to the Boston Red Sox. The rest of his story is now Red Sox history. Ramón also joined the Red Sox late in his pitching career. The brothers were back playing ball together just as they did many years ago in their homeland.

There are many videos of highlights of Pedro pitching, but one of my favorites is this one. He struck out three batters in one inning with only nine pitches.

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